click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
FBC 68
LANGUAGE
English 68
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
times a requirement to break into white-collar fields. john: the first one if they do what a bunch of times, so what? >> the whole idea of a fair wage that basic value is threatened with the rise of unpaid labor. >> because they work for free they take jobs of those that would be paid. >> they have no trace of that is all that is out there. john: it sounds terrible. if they work for nothing it is abuse. >> i would like all of you to be paid but what is compensation? if you are these in turn for the stossel show that it help your career if you are in turn for rain news bureau john: you help people find internships. >> but i give tuesday night -- seven hours per week. >> they will not pay? >> but they are losing their own employees they don't have the money you very have the internal not pay them or not at all. john: i built my career on people like you. i do not think it was exploiting new. i needed research help and my employer laughed i would ask a college and i was surprised many were eager to, but afterwards they said i learned more from you than college and i didn't have to pay
a job but multiple times a requirement to break into white-collar fields. john: the first one if they do what a bunch of times, so what? >> the whole idea of a fair wage that basic value is threatened with the rise of unpaid labor. >> because they work for free they take jobs of those that would be paid. >> they have no trace of that is all that is out there. john: it sounds terrible. if they work for nothing it is abuse. >> i would like all of you to be paid but what is compensation? if you are these in turn for the stossel show that it help your career if you are in turn for rain news bureau john: you help people find internships. >> but i give tuesday night -- seven hours per week. >> they will not pay? >> but they are losing their own employees they don't have the money you very have the internal not pay them or not at all. john: i built my career on people like you. i do not think it was exploiting new. i needed research help and my employer laughed i would ask a college and i was surprised many were eager to, but afterwards they said i learned more from you than college and i didn'
to enter the challenge the impossible promotion >> john: the fact that american police tell little kids they don't have the proper permits to do this, made me wonder, what does it take to open a lemonade stand legally in america. >> they directed me to this website. >> this is supposed to make life simple. >> they make it easy, except, what? >> there was unintelligible questions. >> what is an assistant. >> an employee identification number. >> the government said i needed to take a 15hour protection class to sell lonade. >> i don't have a bicycle. >> and then an exam and wait weeks to find out if i passed. then i would buy a government approved fire extinguisher it could take months, forget it. so i did it without a permit. max's lawyer gave me the okay. i didn't sell anything. i had to give every refunds. first, the customers thought it was crazy. many once had their own lemonade stands. >> did you have to get a license? >> i'm in canada and i can't let you dri this. >> there are so many rules, i'm not allowed to sell this to you. >> i didn't have time to get all the permits. >> you d
b smith, tobin smith, jonas max ferris. and john, is this madness? lawmakers are fighting over what to cut, they're reallocating funds for all that pork. >> yeah, this shows exactly how bad of a character our lawmakers have in d.c. look, we have no energy plan. our education system drops in world rankings, we have no jobs plan. we have no plan. we don't even have a budget and yet, these guys are still filling things with pork to get reelected. if you're in private practice and you take money supposed to go to some project and you build a fence around your house, whether that fence is good, makes your house look better and whether your neighbors like it, it's stealing and that's exactly what these guys are doing, it's called pork and it's stealing and shows the character of our congress and it shows why our country is so screwed up. >> brenda: well, gary b, what about digging private wealth for private property owners? what's going on? >> well, i tell you what, brenda, on the one hand we have 85% of americans think there should be a balanced budget. it is in ourlood. i mean, every ho
by assigning it an activity which is an expensive mess no matter who undertakes it. i would rather have john and steve use their powers of persuasion and libertarian instincts to apply to another need. privatize elementary schools. >> a subject for another conversation. we'll have that conversation. mike, by the way to clarify to, the tsa denied wrong doing with this marine. i wouldn't take their word or anybody's right now. >> my personal experience is all i can go by. when i have flown i've seen tsa be extremely inefficient. i remember going through check points and the magnetic scanners and then waiting at the boarding area after we all have gone through everything, three workers there one of them randomly would pick someone to check. the other two were standing there. >> sounds like one of these government work projects. >> i agree with mike it's inefficient. we have the tsa acting like bouncers at a bar, basically treating that marine or 95-year-old ladies like terrorists. the thing is when you privatize the people know that they have to treat customers with respect, not like they are p
. liz: we have phillip in the pits of the cme. a pretty wild day. plus our market panel. john tanglewood and ron weiner. before we get to those two gentlemen, let's start with phillip at the cme. it was an interesting day. at one point we were down nearly 120 points. another we would up 51 points. which side do we end tomorrow? >> real interesting day, liz. i woke up. i saw the news on cyprus. i turn on fox. everything is happy. i thought we would blow to the upside and it would be a great day. the clouds had lifted but it was behind us now. later on as the day developed dutch finance minister coming out saying this problem might not be over. we might assess other euro area banks and might be too large and ask them to restructure or downsize. that starts to get the fears of contagion. that's why you saw the s&p 500 give up its gains, trade off to the lows. you saw the euro currency sell off as well. a little bit of bidding coming into the end of the day. that is just your first quarter, the guys trying to get the window-dressing on. the second thing you have guys that came in, sold short
on whether they deal with this. going to john brown, and or own nicole petallides on whether they can and will. nicole knows of what she speaks. her parents are from cyprus and she has visited there many times or so. these are wholly mes. >> i am so glad that you're painting it in the proper way. this is .2% of europe's gdp. it isa small island and it is being menial to so many. but it paints a picture of what is going onthere. which is catastrophic. you go in there and you are talking about confiscating peoples money. not letting them have access and availability to them. almost turning this over what really is a huge political battle around the world. the russians and germans and the eurozone and cyprus is caught in the middle. in the meantime from the people are not able to access their money. they don't have gas lines. they are not able to get gas. it is unbelievable the fact that they are living there. the fact that they are frightened and scared. they work so hard to put money in the bank. neil: your parents were born there. they are not there now. a lot of money find its attrac
and wall street -- neil: john -- >> it's contagious. neil: you need something to look forward to like individuals need it. that's what makes you spend and the members spend and all of us spend, and when we get nervous we don't do that; right? >> right. we just dig heels in as i said, and i think what the elected officials just ail to observe and do, neil, is just really respect where people are coming from, and, frankly, stop taxes, stop regulations, fewer lawsuits, let's help get small business out of the hole they are in, and it's just a classic example of how very little most of our elected officials understand how a business, a small business is run in america. that's just too bad. neil: all right. we'll watch closely. thank you, all, for your help today. we'll keep a close eye on all the developments and the president's trip and whether this economy is going to go up. tomorrow, a lookat numbers you don't really quite see all the . melissa: i'm melissa francis and here's what's "money" tonight of the as we speak setting themselves up for a run on the bank. cypriot banks closed unt
'm bearish, a little overbought right now. >> brenda: john your prediction. >> best buy turn around getting rave reviews, up. >> brenda: and toby. >> it's up 25% before it goes down 25%. >> brenda: jonas? >> okay. around word on street. bribing the tonight show to it move to new york city. the credit card-- >> bill or bear. >> letterman in new york-- >> and jay leno, and john ji carson and-- neil cavuto is up next. >> neil: the unions are starting to get loud, but is their message starting to get old? >> glad to have you, and over the top union protests. in michigan, they're mad about a right to work law that starts next week. and in washington, they're mad about all of the automatic spending cuts they say will get worse every week. but with right toork states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and
east. i was st. john fan and walter berry teams and the 84 final four with the big east teams. we know history of the big east. we know the -- there is the current big east. the big east is different and that will be a conference with a new name. are you disappointed with the way things panned out? now it is a mid major? what do you think of the way the whole thing turned out for you? >> these have been challenging times. they have been difficult times. we've come through it very well. this is not a mid major as well. this is chance for football schools with basketball to become realigned. connell: you characterize the big east, the new conference. >> careful how i characterize it. we're the current big east. new conference soon. connell: you said this is major conference like the acc? it is a major college sports conference. >> we see ourselves. no reason we shouldn't. we have good football schools that will improve. we have big brand. we're in big cities. in major metropolitan areas. we have programs in florida that are enormous and doing very well. we have programs like cincinnati a
articles of clothing that even more resemble. it. >> what do you expect her to do? she's told john from the beatles. >> is not the first career. that is for a short. a thing to closing is rubbish on both sides of it. stealing stuff is stealing. >> i don't know why she would want to plan the she was the designer of those. it would you want that to mcclendon that was part of your creative genius there. sandra: i can see a few people walking around in the greenwich village, but i am not thinking of this going to work. all right. well, moving along, not altogether different. a guitar played by john lennon has just to the auction block. our box played by not only john lennon but george harrison from the bills. the guitar is expected to sell for between $20,300,000. would you guys -- >> if i had money to burn and love the beatles will be a fun thing dan, but you know who will buy it? the irs. >> wonder where that tall went. the first place we will go to is yoko ono is apartment. [laughter] sandra: but a guitar. at least this is something that can hold value. >> absolutely. sandra: we have see
founder and ceo, weighing in as our bear, john -- [inaudible] senior portfolio manager. and i think i'm going to start here with you, ned, on the issue of, you know, we've had this great rally. we've had these big numbers coming out and, obviously, everyone is kind of getting cautious, getting nervous. that makes sense. what do you say to those that are looking for that new high on the s&p maybe by the end of the trading week? >> well, i don't know if it's trading week or if it's another month before we hit a high in the s&p. this has been the rodney dangerfield kind of market, getting no respect whatsoever. [laughter] people talk about the retail coming back into the marketplace. we've got to consider the backdrop that in the last four years retail investors have sort of dishorded $400 billion worth of equity mutual funds, and the first six weeks of this year was a small pittance that came back into the market. retail is still scared. they don't believe it, they're still skeptics, and i like that backdrop. that's a great, positive backdrop to have. you buy when the news is bad, you b
, this is house speaker joh john boehner. >> we are open with each other, we're honest with each other, but we're trying to bridge some big differences. >> do you trust president obama? >> absolutely. lou: saying it was more of a looming crisis. the ncaa march madness tournament is set to tip off tomorrow between a couple number 16 seed, liberty university and north carolina. the four number one, louisville, kansas, and say that and india indiana. no matter who cut down the net at the end of this tournament the real winners are cbs and turner sports. the report shows cbs and time warner sports took in more than a billion dollars in ad sales revenue during the tournament last year. the 2012 nfl playoffs and super bowl brought in a lousy $976 million. the nba last season brought in just about half of that in ad revenue. oceans 11 style heist costing the largest casino more than $33 million, high-stakes gambling and an accomplice scanned the hotel and casino by hacking into the security cameras. signaling the gambler on how to bet and went bet and all they needed was eight hands of cards. expect
? >> right. you know, mit health economist john grouper looked at the policy, uneasy about it saying there's a thin line between discriminating between sick workers and have a wellness program. they might be looking into getting the benefit provider to suggest a wellness program, but as matt mentioned, the best wellness program is giving individuals the opportunity to oversee their own health care, their own health care decisions, and that is the only kind of empowerment that comes through direct transactions from patients and doctors without all these many payers in the system clogging up the paperwork and pipeline of money in between. >> neil, duke university did a study, and they showed that obese individuals cost up to 51,000 or 52,000 worker's comp claims comparee to a healthy individual of 7,000. cvs says it's pure numbers. plain and simple. they are not looking at the humanistic side of this, which is what we are discussing now. they care about the numbers. neil: i understand, but, matt, i think there's a threat here, and it could just veer this direction where we create this master
's not worth it for many youngsters, i say it's a lousy deal. does john stossel agree with me? he's next. ♪ you make me want to shout ♪ ♪ throw my hands up and come on now ♪ ♪ don't forget to say you will ♪ (announcer) scottrade knows oure and invest their own way. wi scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services mpany." ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... we're not simply saluting history... we're maki it. all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on yo
, bloated nature exists at the cost of all of us. dagen: is the danger, john, we continue on with unemployment still stubbornly high, still very close to 8%, that the longer we struggle as a economy, the more they will rely on the government to be there and provide a safety net. >> i think people are wise as to what is going on there. it is still a very abnormally high number. it is high because of government barriers. obamacare is an increased cost placed on businesses that makes it far more expensive to hire workers. 7.7%, the nature of job opportunities is greatly reduced for all americans. the president cannot create jobs, but in obama's case, he can create a lot of barriers to job creation. there is a lot of skepticism. dagen: gasoline prices going up again. we would like to blame whoever is in the white house for gasoline prices. >> i would argue that it is very much in the white house's hands. people are going to work every day and it cost a lot more to get there. this is a simple dollar problem. you would very quickly seek gasoline prices falling. you would see a f
street -- neil: john -- >> it's contagious. neil: you need something to look forward to like individuals need it. that's what makes you spend and the members spend and all of us spend, and when we get nervous, we don't do that; right? >> right. we just dig heels in as i said, and i think what the elected officials just fail to observe and do, neil, is just really respect where people are coming from, and, frankly, stop taxes, stop regulations, fewer lawsuits, let's help get small business out of the hole they are in, and it's just a classic example of how very little most of our elected officials understand how a business, a small business is run in america. that's just too bad. neil: all right. we'll watch closely. thank you, all, for your help today. we'll keep a close eye on all the developments and the president's trip and whether this economy is going to go up. tomorrow, a look at numbers you don't really quite see all the time that might beg that issue.y ♪ here's gerri willis. >> good evening, everybody. tonight, a cyberattack paralyzes banks an media companies in south korea. wh
recognize him from "the wall street journal." that is him on the right there. john, let me start with you. >> yes. melissa: seems like they're making a situation that could have been resolved because of course they're not taking the 10% levy on deposits but keeping banks closed. people are beginning to panic. they're almost guaranteeing a run on the bank. are they making the situation worse? >> not politically. if tomorrow you wake up and you find there is a 10% tax on your bank deposits, you will not be happy. if you're a politician in cyprus you're dealing with this and they're bank backing away from it. it was a bad idea in the first place. cyprus needs $10 billion from the european union and the european central bank and they have given others like greece hundreds of billions of dollars. so they're upset. the cypriot banks are insolvent. they're going, they will get a run. melissa: they are insolvent and they will get a run, yeah. >> but it's not cyprus's fault in my view. melissa: doesn't matter whose fault it is if it happens. julia, what is the outcome? what is the domino effect? w
as the s&p 500 futures close. let's bring in our market panel. john and dan. sandra: i knew i would stumble on that. come on, adam. thanks for saving me anyway. start with you, first, john. according to some notes i read from you today, you think that the market, where it stands today is actually fairly priced. you believe, you're rather optimistic you think things could head higher. what keeps you up at night? what could get in the way of things looking, bright in the future? we sold off somewhat significantly today. >> well, what i actually said was given current earnings and given current interest rate levels and current inflation level that the market was fairly priced but, we still are of the view that the market is in a secular trading range and it is up towards the top of that. and we, we just believe that with the aggressiveness of the federal reserve and now with the japanese central bank and then with the cyprus situation exacerbating the european banking situation, we think that aggressive monetary policy is going to lead to inflation and we're much more bullish on gold and commo
steps down and takes full responsibility. john madden football game was-- it's 18 on ea. a different story at ebay, chief john donahue's salary about doubled, 30 million after the stock gained 70%, a lot of that thanks to paypal of course, and we have ebay up at 51. and nicole, boeing got a big order for 787 discount ryanair. when i say discount, i mean deep, deep, deep, deep discount. what's the stock? >> up arrow there, you can see it right now, 85.79 for boeing, 15.6 billion dollar deal for these passenger jets from boeing, 175 people passenger jets. this is obviously a deal that they just announced and low cost carrier of course, ryanair is, it's a big deal for boeing and that's why you're seeing an up arrow. by the way, the market, i was looking to see where it was. stuart: ryanair is the organization that removed two bathrooms from the back of the plane so they could put in more seats and make more profit. nicole: i did not know that. stuart: and then they charge you for a bathroom visit and charge you for some water and charge you for hand luggage, but they're wildly profitabl
, are in the red today despite better than expected housing data and of course investors worry about contain john from -- contagion cyprus bailout plan or bail-in. adam: bail-in. tracy: we have team coverage, nicole petallides, her parents are from cyprus and sandra smith looking at homebuilders. nicole, we'll go down to you first. the dow felt this a little more yesterday than today, didn't it? >> it was interesting. this morning we had green on the screen. we got in good housing numbers, tracy and adam. as we god more headlines from cyprus and the vote which is underway now, shows you worry and contagion fears that exist not only in cyprus and eurozone. that trends over here to the united states of america. you can see the dow is down one-third of 1%, a short time ago we had on dennis, a former cyprus trade representative to the united states, heavily involved. he deals with people who have big deposits there. people who do business there. and he talked about the fact that yesterday, we saw global markets losing $500 billion yesterday was lost. that was just one day. cyprus is so tiny and look
balanced fund comanager and john golder man. scott over at the cme, was this a cyprus selloff or is there something more to it? >> no. it definitely is a cyprus something. i wouldn't really call it a selloff. in fact over, if this happened last week during the week or even during this week instead of over the weekend we may not have seen the s&ps down 13, 14, 15 like they were overnight. and what this really is a point is that anybody that gets this pullback, people waiting for any sort of pullback, immediately are coming back into the market. that's why we saw this market come back today. i know we had a chance, david, like you said to actually look like we maybe were going to close up on the day and we closed down but we're only half of where we were early in the day today. so there is two things going on here. last week when i was on thursday, we talked about the vix, but we talked about volatility of the vix. we were talking how, boy, just stay in the market, get the market but buy your protection. if anybody had done that people bought that, up 20, 30% today you could hav
and people like it. people like -- >> go ahead, john. >> if there was no private market prior to obama care 50% of health care spending was government. it's now it's going to be 100%. like all of the entitlements costs will go up, services will go down. the real cost won't even be in dollars it will be in people as lives. >> kimberly, let me jump in. part of the law says if you are unwer 150 employees you can get waivers on some of these. aren't we basically telling people it new hire more? >> look at the practical impact. this is going to cycle people that have any entrepreneurial spirit whatsoever, left after getting trampled by this administration and all of the regulations on small businesses and now they are kneecapping them with this health care. they have an incentive now to in fact hire less people. they have incentive to reduce the number of hours employees are working like cake makers in order to avoid paying for their health insurance. we're going to become a nation of part-time workers. i don't see how in the big picture this is going to benefit the country or the economy. >> wa
report. john, thanks for being with us. great to have you on the show, now, this story surprised me because i thought the drought killed you all, and hear that farmland is on fire, and, in fact, some investment banks out there try to snap up as african as they can, i was surprised by that. what's going on? >> well, it's not quite as drastic as it appears. first off, remember 80% of the farms that are sold are bought by other farmers or the farmer next door who is retired. the idea that the outside comes in and buys, actually, there's more outside investing money in ten years ago. farmers buy the land. that's ad goo thing for the country and for the industry. it's also important to remember that this run up in prices for the land is fed by extraordinary circumstances with global demand for commodities that attracted all kinds of money, and at the same time, farmers are enjoying, at least in the grain farming sector, not so much in the protein, livestock, and milk sector, but they see record profits. similar, we have not seen this literally for a century from 1910-1914. gerri: values
are focusing on our sam, sam adams beer company, and also keeping ni on papa john's. they have hit all-time highs. and we can talk about the gains they have seen over the last 52 weeks, one year. up 107% for constellation brands. also, papa john's and boston beer gaining more than 60% in the last 52 weeks. very nice. back to you. cheryl: thank you very much, big performers on the screen, thank you, nicole. as the united states beefs up the cyber security, competition is heating up to find the best way to ward off hackers. palo alto networks joining me now with a fox business exclusive when we have news of cyber security. let's talk about this meeting. the new treasury secretary meets with chinese officials talking about cyber security. how big of a threat do you think the chinese truly are? >> larger than any other single country or actor. there are several very focused, very well-funded and they're used the technology and their wherewithal to steal things, break into you get your passwords, corporate espionage. cheryl: do you get a sense the u.s. government is the group best to fight
, like little christmas goodies every time john ke kerrr barack obama visits a place. neil: you can see how americans are seeing this even federal contractors that are being laid off no rounds. >> furloughs are delayed by weeks, they threaten these will happen. neil: i get e-mails from them saying it is happening, you could be right. they hear something like this, and say, that does not wash, right. >> they are right, it does not wash, john kerry announced $250 million of new money for egypt when he was there last. this money -- >> 750 million in more than a week, you know. >> always treated like this is discretionary money, we can always do this, what are you naive person or bump kin criticizing this money. >> i find it interesting you kept staring at me when you said bump kin. >> so, you know, high priority on how things look, this does not look good? >> i've discovered in this debate about the sequester, put this in perspective, about 50 billion of cuts out of a 4 trillion-dollar budget, they are small and inconsequential, the white house they shout armageddon, they think that everyt
to take a hands-on approach to the removal of bashar al-assad. and as senator john mccain looking for a no-fly zone to be instituted. while calling for surgical airstrikes to help drive the bashar al-assad. the president repeated that any evidence of this weapon to use would be a game changer, as he put it. president obama defended his administration's reluctance to use military force to quell the syrian civil war. >> when we are working with the syrians themselves, so this is not externally imposed, but rather something that is linked directly with the aspirations of the people inside of syria, it will work better. lou: the king has also said the same. inside jordan comment they are the they delivered with answer should bashar al-assad we powers. >> we need to institute a transition as quickly as possible. if the issue ever came up, all of us would have to put our heads together and figure out if that would help the balance quickly. lou: the senate in the midst of a vote. their expressions, not ours. a senate budget bill being passed for the first time in more than four years. the congres
by more than 100%. look at that 116, or more they said. here to help u crunch the numbers, john lacy, vice president of group benefits with boo sard insurance. i thought this was supposed to bring costs down. seems across the board no matter which irns insurance company you look at aetna, blue cross, costs are going up. how is that possible? >> melissa, the one thing that wasn't exactly clear, health care reform actually changed some of the rules for community rating. when they changed those community rating rus, the carriers no clearly when you do that some premiums are going to rise. there is no doubt some of these premiums, for some individuals and small groups will fall. melissa: like who? who will get the benefit? as i read through all this, all i see is the numbers you're seeing on the screen right there, more premiums go up. who will do better? only people with preexisting conditions? >> for example, if i had a four-person bakery and all of us over 60 years of old, just the four of uu we could see a premium decrease today, i'm sorry in 2014 over today. but if you were to use that sa
that. >> that's right. they want. neil: what you think of this, john? >> this really affects the mom-and-pop businesses. your great big restaurants, they will not be as adversely affected and your small businesses and your mom and pops. this does not affect that many of the poor people, like it is being proposed that it is. only about 10 to 15% of people in low incomes rely on this minimum wage. the average family is making $40,000 a year. this is the wrong way to go about it if they are trying to help low-income workers. neil: what is weird if you think about it, it is not talking about extending the millionaires tax. so there won't be any immediate tax we from new york. it is also talking about oil cracking. so for a lot of folks looking for an economic reprieve, that's not what happened. it is almost like there is a concerted effort to push this right over the edge. >> they just don't want to stop. it doesn't make any sense for what they're doing. >> where will we get the refund. neil: in order to make these minimums, you have to fire people, right? >> the entry level, they don't
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)